Theft refers to the unlawful taking of another person’s property without consent or the legal right to do so. Under North Carolina law, theft goes by another name: “Larceny.” Regardless of which term the charges against you use, you face criminal penalties. The severity of the consequences depends on whether the state charges you with misdemeanor larceny or felony larceny. 

According to FindLaw, larceny of property with a value of less than $1,000 is a Class 1 misdemeanor. This is the only instance in which North Carolina legislature classifies theft as a misdemeanor. In most other cases, larceny is a felony. 

Once the value of the stolen property exceeds $1,000, the crime becomes a Class H felony. The same is true if you knowingly receive stolen goods with a value of more than $1,000. 

The theft of motor fuel is a Class F felony. This is the case regardless of how much in fuel you cipher from another vehicle, fuel pump or tank. 

If you steal property from your employer, the state may charge you with a Class C felony. This is the case if the value of the stolen property is $100 or greater. If the property has a value of less than $100, the state may charge you with a Class H felony. 

There are certain instances in which larceny is an automatic felony offense, regardless of the value of the stolen property. For instance, if you take property off the person of another (such as a purse, wallet or cell phone), use an explosive or firearm to commit the crime or commit burglary, the charge automatically upgrades to a felony. The same is true if you steal property that is a record in the custody of the North Carolina State Archives.